Yeti Footprint Photos Go under the Hammer
Mystery Casebook By Nigel Reynolds, Arts Correspondent

Photograph-Eric Shipton [left] with his team on a reconaissance trip to Everest in 1951

The first photographic evidence that the yeti, or abominable snowman, might be more than a flight of Himalayan fancy has surfaced in public and is to be offered at auction later this month.

Four photographs of large paw prints in the snow beneath Mount Everest are to be sold at Christie's in London on September 26.

The images were taken by the legendary British mountaineer Eric Shipton on a reconaissance trip to Everest in 1951, in preparation for the first successful ascent of the 29,028 ft peak two years later.

Tom Bourdillon, who was also in the reconaissance party, later gave Shipton's black and white prints, which measure 6ins by 4ins, to a friend, Michael Davies.

advertisementMr Davies' descendants are now selling the historic souvenirs, which are expected to fetch £2,500.

The first European claim of a sighting of a large bear-like beast in the Himalayas was made in 1925, but there was no photographic back-up until Shipton's pictures.

On the back of one of his images, Bourdillon wrote to Davies about the team's sighting of the prints.

He said: "We came across them on a high path on the Nepal-Tibet watershed during the 1951 Everest expedition.

"They seem to have come over a secondary path at about 19,500 ft down to 19,000 ft where we first saw them and then went on down the glazier.

"We followed them for the better part of a mile. What it is I donít know, but I am quite clear that it is no animal known to live in the Himalaya and that it is big."

Edmund Hillary, who first climbed the mountain with Tenzing Norgay, later said in a book that a member of his successful party had found a tuft of long black hairs on a rock. The hairs were said to look like bristles.

Publication of Shipton's pictures prompted several expeditions to search for the Yeti but they all proved to be inconclusive.

Source & References:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/09/05/wyeti105.xml

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